Spencer Museum of Art The University of Kansas

Welcome to the Spencer Collection

Dead Union Soldiers
  • Kiowa peoples
  • Dead Union Soldiers, 1890s–1901
  • Where object was made: United States
  • ledger drawing
  • Object Height/Width: 18.1 x 29.3 cm
    Object Height/Width: 7 1/8 x 11 9/16 in
    Mat Dimensions: 14 x 19 in
  • Museum purchase: Peter T. Bohan Art Acquisition Fund
  • Not on display
  • 2013.0005
Label Text
Exhibitions

Exhibition Label:
"Roots and Journeys: Encountering Global Arts and Cultures", 14-Jul-2011
After the 1874 Red River War, United States military troops detained more than seventy Native American leaders at Fort Marion, Florida. In an attempt to educate and Westernize their prisoners, jailors supplied them with ink, crayon, colored pencil, and paper from unused ledger books. Using these new materials, twenty-six young Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho men at Fort Marion composed narrative scenes of biographical and historical events. This new genre, called ledger art, evolved directly from an enduring tradition of pictorial hide painting. Ledger drawings eventually spread beyond the prison walls and into the artistic repertoire of Plains Indians. Created at the turn of the 20th century, these three examples illustrate the general style and content of ledger art during its period of peak development.


Exhibition Label:
"Roots and Journeys: Encountering Global Arts and Cultures," Jun-2013, Cassandra Mesick
After the 1874 Red River War, United States military troops detained more than seventy Native American leaders at Fort Marion, Florida. In an attempt to educate and Westernize their prisoners, jailors supplied them with ink, crayon, colored pencil, and paper from unused ledger books. Using these new materials, twenty-six young Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho men at Fort Marion composed narrative scenes of biographical and historical events. This new genre, called ledger art, evolved directly from an enduring tradition of pictorial hide painting. Ledger drawings eventually spread beyond the prison walls and into the artistic repertoire of Plains Indians. Created at the turn of the 20th century, these three examples illustrate the general style and content of ledger art during its period of peak development.